Americans with Disabilities Act Compliance Plan

City of Columbia TDOT ADA Transition Plan

The City of Columbia has been working on a transition plan that will reflect the results of the survey that is in progress to determine which the five sections (called Titles) in ADA: Employment (Title I), Public Services and Transportation (Title II), Public Accommodations (Title III), Telecommunications (Title IV), and Other Provisions (Title V) require improvement.

Our early work suggests that both programmatic and architectural barriers to persons with disabilities interested in accessing the City of Columbia's programs and service exist. The City has inventoried our facilities, walkways and streets to compile a list of things that need to be addressed to enable the citizens of Columbia with a disability to be provided the same programs and services as other citizens.

Although a number of steps have been taken to ensure compliance with Title I of the ADA, such as policies and procedures to request accommodations, policies on discrimination and harassment, the establishment of the ADA coordinator, established complaint procedure and training for new employees during the onboarding process, additional steps are necessary. The City has reviewed the recruitment process and written guidelines have been developed and will be widely disseminated to all hiring authorities after Council approves a charter revision. The establishment of an accommodation committee with disabled citizens and more training are currently being worked on. Each aspect of employment must be conducted without bias or discrimination towards disabled individuals.

The City created a task force with representation from each department to perform the study and inventory facilities and program accessibility weaknesses. The ADA Task Force was established and charged with developing a self-evaluation instrument. The Task Force meets regularly as needed throughout the year to monitor compliance issues as identified in this report.

The Parks and Recreation Department offers most of the City's events and programs. They have inventoried all of the 21 parks within the City. The outdoor pavilion at Cook Soccer Park has been completed with ADA accessibility to pavilion and field 5. Completed accessibility to two restrooms and parking at Cook. Splash Pad at Riverwalk Park was made ADA accessible with an outdoor path. In addition, Riverwalk Park, Betty Lee Park and Ridley Park are ADA accessible. Woodland Park playground and playground

pavilion is ADA accessible along with the Parks and Recreation office, entrance and parking at the Rainey House (office) Fairview Park has one ballfield accessible and the Fairview Center has an accessible entrance, kitchen and restrooms.

The remaining parks have been assessed and based on what is required, establish a priority list that includes but is not limited to, provision of adaptive equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, provision of auxiliary aids and services, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites, or the alteration of existing facilities.

 

The following still need to be addressed:

Parks and Recreation

Signage

Downstairs fitness center at Armory.

 

Signage

Playground and Shelters at Woodland Park

Ordered and lines painted

Signage

Fairview Concession Stand

 

Signage

Unnamed new park behind E.A. Cox school

 

Walkways

Fairview Park

 

Walkways

Cook Park Fields 3 & 4

 

Walkways

Tennis Courts at Woodland Park

 

Walkways

Ballfields behind new unnamed park

 

Walkways

Eva Gilbert

 

Ramp Instillation

Downstairs fitness center at Armory.

Poured in January 2020, waiting on rail arrival and installation.

Door Closures

Various sites

 

Detectable Warning Signs

Ridley Park

 

ADA Accessibility

Fitness Center downstairs Armory

 

ADA Accessibility

Restrooms by tennis courts Woodland Park

 

ADA Accessibility

Restrooms at Macedonia Center

 

ADA Accessibility

Restrooms at playground at Fairview Park

 

All other City departments have surveyed their buildings and facilities and established a list of areas to be addressed. The codes enforcement department is assisting with this process.

Police Department

Door hardware on police annex is too low

404.27

 

Ramp to annex not slip resistant and is too steep

302.1, 403.3

 

Ramp handrail not compliant

505.10.1

 

Tactile star on elevator door is missing

407.2.3

 

Tactile sign on restrooms is in wrong location

703.4

 

Restroom door closing too fast

40402

 

Toilet door not self-closing

604.8

 

Parking for annex is not ADA compliant; stall sidewalk ramp does not have level landing

406.3, 406.4

 

All floors the countertop depth us not deep enough

904.4

 

Restroom door less than 18” from edge of door with no obstruction

404.2

 

Toe clearance under lavatory in restrooms not met

306.3

 

 

Fire Station 1

Van accessible stalls

502.2, 502.6

 

Accessible route from parking space

502.3

 

Accessible door not wide enough

404.2

 

Door threshold too tall

402.2

 

No tactile sign at restrooms

703.4

 

Interior doors not wide enough

404.2

 

ADA and non-ADA signage not placed for restrooms

703.4

 

Coat hook at wrong height

603.4

 

Grab bar in restroom not compliant

604.5

 

Toilet paper in wrong location

604.7

 

Countertop not deep enough (all floors)

904.4

 

Restroom door not wide enough

404.2

 

Clearance under lavatory & height in restroom not met

306.2, 606.3

 

Clear floor space around water closet too small

604.3

 

Flush control on toilet in wrong location

604.6

 

Fire Station 2 – Lion Parkway

Front door hardware not compliant

404.2

 

Wrong tactile sign height and background color

703.5

 

 

Fire Station 4 - Trotwood

Door threshold too high

402.2

 

Protrusion from wall > 4”

307.2

 

Tactile sign for restroom not correctly located.

703.4

 

Door hardware not compliant

404.2

 

No bench in locker room area

404.2

 

No signage for restrooms

703.4

 

No coat hook in restroom

603.4

 

Disabled parking space ramp – no level landing

405.7, 403.3

 

Van accessible space & route not installed or incorrect

502.2, 502.6, 502.3

 

No hand rail for ramps higher than 6”

405.8

 

Less than 18” with no obstruction for door

404.2

 

Door clearance too narrow

4.4.2

 

Restroom in wrong location and wrong size

604.5, 609.3

 

Grab bar clearance not compliant

609.3

 

Toilet paper in wrong location

604.7

 

Fire Station 5 – Nashville Highway

Door hardware too high

404.2

 

No tactile sign at restrooms

703.4, 703.5

 

No ADA sign on restrooms

216.8

 

Coat hook at wrong height

603.4

 

Towel dispenser at wrong location

308.2

 

Grab bars not compliant

604.5

 

Restroom door not self-closing

604.8

 

Restroom door hardware not compliant

604.8

 

No van accessible space or route

502.2, 502.6, 502.3

 

Parking spaces and stall sidewalk tramp – no level landing

405.7, 403.3, 406.3, 406.4

 

Ramp width and handrail not compliant

405.5

 

Water fountain too high for a greater than 4” protrusion

307.2

 

Restroom door less than 18” from edge of door with no obstruction

404.2

 

Unprotected pipes under lavatory

606.5

 

Insufficient clearance from wall for toilet

604.2

 

Restroom clear floor space at fixture

604.3

 

Toilet flush control at wrong location

604.6

 

Toilet compartment not 60” wide

604.8

 

 

City Hall

ADA signage at east door not installed

216.6

2020

Entrance Door closes too fast

404.2

2020

First floor tactile restroom sign in wrong location.

703.4

2020

ADA parking, disabled space sidewalk ramp not on level ground

406.3, 406.4

 

No Van accessible parking space & route

502.2, 502.6, 502.3

 

ADA countertop space not compliant

306.3

2020

Wastewater

No ADA van parking stall sign and wrong height

502.6

 

Main door closing too fast

404.2

 

Mats not secured to floor

303.2

 

Defibrillator more than 4” protrusion wrong placement

307.2

 

Tactile star on elevator missing

407.2.3

 

Tactile sing on women’s restroom in wrong location

703.4

 

Restroom door hardware not compliant

404.2

 

Coat hook too high

603.4

 

Unprotected pipes under lavatory (womens)

606.5

 

Towel dispenser at wrong location

308.2

 

Grab bar wrong location

604.5

 

Toilet paper holder in wrong location

604.7

 

Restroom door not self-closing

604.8

 

No door pull on the women’s restroom stall

604.8

 

Front desk countertops not compliant

904.4, 306.2

 

Door less than 18” from edge of door w/o obstruction

404.2

 

Flush controller wrong side

604.6

 

Public Works

Tactile signs not braille

703.2

 

Tactile sign on restrooms in wrong location

703.4

 

Locker room bench does not abut wall or have back

903

 

Restroom signs wrong location and not in braille

703.4

 

Restroom coat hook too high

603.4

 

Grab bars wrong location in men’s room

604.5

 

Toilet paper holder in wrong location (women’s)

604.7

 

No door pull on restroom stall

604.8

 

Parking stall sign too low

502.6

 

Parking stall slope too steep

502.4

 

Disabled stall sidewalk ramp does not have flairs

406.3

 

Restroom door less than 18”from edge of door with no obstruction

404.2

 

Restroom clear floor space at fixture

604.3

 

Flush controller on wrong side

604.6

 

 

Streets and Sidewalks

Public Works has been bringing projects into compliance upon reconstruction. All established sidewalks are being evaluated for needed improvements. A list of these improvements has been compiled. The prioritized projects are addressed as funding becomes available and based on the schedule provided.

 

No.

Street/Intersection Name

Sidewalks

HC Ramps

Tactile Surface

Estimated Completion

1

Downtown square corners

Y

Y

N

2020

2

S Main St & E 8th St

Y

Y

N

2020

3

S Main St & E 9th St

Y

N

N

2020

4

Woodland St & E 9th St

Y

N

N

2020

5

Woodland St & Andrews

Y

Y

N

2020

6

Woodland St & E 8th St

Y

Y

N

2021

7

S Glade St & E 9th St

NR

N

N

2021

8

S Glade St & E 7th St

Y

N

N

2021

9

Woodland & E 7th St

Y

N

N

2021

10

Bridge St & E 10th St

Y

Y

N

2021

11

Polk St & Willow

Y

N

N

2022

12

E 15 St & S Main St

Y

N

N

2022

13

E 12th & Glade St

Y

N

N

2022

14

E 11th & E End St

Y

Y

N

2022

15

E 11th & Bridge St

Y

Y

N

2022

16

E 11th & Comstock St

Y

Y

N

2023

17

E 8th & Bridge St

Y

N

N

2023

18

E 9th & Mapleash

Y

Y

N

2023

19

E 9th & Bridge St

Y

Y

N

2023

20

W 17th & Highland Ave

Y

N

N

2023

21

High St & W 6th St

Y

Y

N

2024

22

High & W 8th St

Y

N

N

2024

23

High & W 5th St

Y

N

N

2024

24

Woodland & Andrews

Y

N

N

2024

25

Dunnington & W 7th St

Y

Y

N

2024

26

Highland & W 14th

Y

Y

N

2025

27

W 9th & School

Y

Y

N

2025

28

Galloway & W 13th

Y

Y

N

2025

29

S Garden & W 10th

Y

N

N

2025

30

S Garden & W 11th

Y

N

N

2025

31

Chapman & Santa Fe Pk

Y

Y

N

2026

32

Santa Fe Pk & James Campbell

Y

Y

N

2026

33

Santa Fe Pk & Hill St

Y

Y

N

2026

34

E 11th & Glade St

Y

Y

N

2026

35

S Main & Depot St

Y

Y

N

2026

36

S Main & E 10th St

Y

Y

N

2027

37

S Main & E 12th St

Y

NR

N

2027

38

S Main & W 14th St

Y

Y

N

2027

 

*NR - Needs Replacement

 

 

 

 

The Engineering department maintains a pavement management system which contains an inventory of all City streets, and each year determines which projects will be funded.

  1. and appropriate number of spaces

Projects continue to be addressed as funding is available. Yearly planning for the highest priority projects should continue with the budget process.


Many City buildings were constructed prior to the enactment of access codes and were not originally designed to provide ready access for individuals with disabilities. While facilities constructed in more recent years have differing degrees of accessibility, various features within them are deficient as a result of changing code provisions. Some structures, however, have undergone remodeling and alterations and consequently do comply more fully with current standards. In general with respect to City facilities that were reviewed, there is at least one route into most buildings and a considerable number of the public facilities and programs within them are accessible to some degree by current standards. An evaluation of exterior passage ways among City buildings, including such features as curb ramps, walks and sidewalks, handrails, and contrasting striping on stairs, has revealed some areas that are deficient as accessible routes. Additional work is needed to remove the remaining obstacles to program accessibility found among features such as restrooms and other specialized use areas.

Accessibility is not only for individuals with needs related to mobility disabilities, but also for individuals with needs related to speech, cognitive, vision and hearing disabilities. There are many potential barriers to accessibility of City services, and the following are simply a few of the more common examples:

Physical Barriers

Program Barriers

Parking

Building signage

Path of entry/travel

"Customer" communication and interaction

Doors

Access to public telephones

Service Counters

Emergency notifications, alarms, visible signals

Restrooms

Communication (via internet, public meetings, telephones)

Sidewalks and Curb Ramps

Participation in events sponsored by the City

 

Physical Barriers

A public entity may not deny the benefits of its programs, activities, and services to individuals with disabilities because its facilities are inaccessible. A public entity's services, programs, or activities, when viewed in their entirety, must be readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities. This standard, known as "program accessibility," applies to all existing facilities of a public entity. Public entities, however, are not necessarily required to make each of their existing facilities accessible.

 

 

Criteria for Determining Existence of Impediment

Criteria have been established to determine whether corrective action needs to be

taken at a particular facility. The criterion includes, but is not limited to:

  1. The nature of unique programs or services. Some facilities and sites are the

    only location that a particular program or service may be provided; so there

    is limited flexibility to move the program or service to a more accessible facility.

  2. Facilities already in compliance with ADA accessibility guidelines. Several of the City's major facilities were constructed or underwent major renovations after the effective date of the ADA, including City Hall, the Police

    Department, Fire Station #2 and the Public Works Facility.

  3. Ability to relocate programs from one facility to another accessible facility. Because the City may offer special programs and services at more than one location, consideration was given to distribution of the special programs and services when viewed in their entirety;
  4. Current state of accessibility. The current condition of each facility in terms of barriers already removed, or planned to be removed.
  5. Cost. The cost of alternatives to physical barrier removal versus the cost of an alternative corrective action plan; and public use.

f)   Population Served. The population served by a particular program or service and whether the public can obtain service from an alternative City location.


31

Chapman & Santa Fe Pk

Y

Y

N

2026

32

Santa Fe Pk & James Campbell

Y

Y

N

2026

33

Santa Fe Pk & Hill St

Y

Y

N

2026

34

E 11th & Glade St

Y

Y

N

2026

35

S Main & Depot St

Y

Y

N

2026

36

S Main & E 10th St

Y

Y

N

2027

37

S Main & E 12th St

Y

NR

N

2027

38

S Main & W 14th St

Y

Y

N

2027

 

*NR - Needs Replacement

 

 

 

 

Projects are prioritized based on the sidewalks level of use, project cost, and potential to improve overall City connectivity. Sidewalk improvement projects will be implemented as funding is identified, or in association with other City projects that necessitate construction in the City street right-of-way or on City property.

Action Plan

Through these self-evaluations, deficiencies in the City of Columbia's facilities that diminish the ability of disabled persons to benefit from the City's programs, services and activities have and will continue to be identified. For those buildings that have had an assessment, a correction plan or other course of action has been noted for each deficiency, along with a schedule for completion of the correction.

An Action Log has been created for those facilities that have not yet been addressed.

PROGRAMMATIC BARRIERS

The City recognizes not all barriers to the City's programs, services and activities are physical in nature. Other administrative barriers exist that must be overcome to provide complete government services to those who are disabled. The City conducted a self-survey of all City Departments to identify any programmatic barriers that may impact accessibility of City programs, services or activities.  Those items identified are included in other established listing for correction.

Survey Results

The City of Columbia conducted a detailed survey to evaluate each department in the City with regard to ADA compliance. The purpose of this exercise was to identify areas where the City falls short in accommodating people with disabilities.


The majority of City departments interact with the public outside the confines of a public facility. For example, the Police, Fire and Public Works Departments generally interact with the public in the field. As a result, the employees in many cases are forced to adapt to situations that arise in the field. For example, in responding to a call or incident, the physical or mental health of the person needing assistance is not necessarily provided through dispatch. As a result, those responding may need to modify the approach for resolving the issue.

The City departments that have the most routine contact with the public at a City facility are Development Services, the City Recorder's Office, Personnel, and Parks and Recreation.

 

The Development Services Department handles all permitting and inspections in the City and thus has a significant amount of public traffic. The City Recorder's Office handles billing, business licensing, permitting and taxes, which also results in high volumes of people accessing a City facility on a daily basis. It is estimated that a very small percentage of the public that is dealt with on a regular basis has no obvious disabilities. However, each of these departments is committed to providing quality service to all residents in the City and is taking the necessary steps to confirm that they provide their service in a manner that is accessible to all residents.

The Parks and Recreation Department has the most regular contact with residents in the City. This department provides numerous programs for all ages. This department is similar to other city departments in that there is no formal policy in place for accommodating participants with disabilities. However, the department strives to make programs available for anyone to participate. Generally, each case is handled independently and the appropriate accommodations have been made.

Action Plan

Based on the results of the self-surveys, the City will identify future steps and activities that the City can explore to ensure that people with disabilities have access to City services and programs. The City's future plan must address the following elements:

Communication

Effective communication is essential to providing accessible services in that whatever is written or spoken must be as clear and understandable to people with disabilities as it is for people who do not have disabilities. The City used many


forms of communications with residents including the web site, communications relating to City administration and open public meetings, and other communications regarding the City's programs, services and activities. In order to ensure that all forms of communication are accessible, the City is taking specific actions to improve communications, including the following:

  1. ADA Grievance Policy and Procedures. The City has developed a formal Grievance Policy and Procedure for ADA compliance. This document will be made available on the City's website and by contacting Personnel.
  2. Reasonable Modification Policy. The City has will work with individuals to determine an accommodation that meets the needs of the citizen/employee and the City without creating a hardship.
  3. Public Information. All forms of public communication about City programs and activities must address ADA compliance issues specific to the program or activity. In order to ensure that public communication has the appropriate verbiage/statement regarding ADA compliance, they must be approved by the ADA coordinator.
  4. Agenda text. The City posts the agenda to the website so that disabled persons can enhance the size of the print, and in the Council Chambers, all agenda items are displayed on large TV screens in a PowerPoint presentation so citizens can more easily read the items.
  5. Accommodations for participation in Public Meetings. The City will research the feasibility of incorporating equipment, available upon request, specially designed to assist hearing impaired persons to fully participate in City Council Meetings. The City will explore the feasibility of acquiring other aids or services.
  6. Accessibility of Public Meetings. The City has, as discussed above, already taken substantial efforts toward ensuring public meetings are held in ADA-accessible facilities. The City conducts all public meetings in ADA accessible facilities, and to the extent feasible will make specific accommodations, where necessary, to ensure that meetings among residents and City staff can be held within ADA accessible facilities.
  7. Accessibility of Phone Communication. All City departments are equipped with TTD phone line (s).
  8. Interpreter Services -The City will hire an interpreter when advance notice is given and all departments have access to the AVAZA language line.
  9. ADA Compliance in Legal Documents. The City includes appropriate ADA compliance language in all legal documents including, but not limited to: contracts, request for proposals, requests for qualifications, bid requests, job advertisements, and public notices.

10. ADA Compliance for Hiring Procedures. The ADA Compliance officer will review the application, interview and hiring procedures within each department of the City to ensure compliance with ADA.

Municipally Sponsored Programs

The City is committed to allowing persons with disabilities to participate in municipally sponsored programs. This includes recreation opportunities sponsored by the City's Parks and Recreation Department, community meetings and other events hosted or sponsored by the City. The City will achieve this goal by integrating all of the steps outlined above into these programs, including providing for effective communications and ensuring meeting and events are, to the extent possible, held in ADA-accessible parks and facilities. The City is taking additional specific actions to improve accessibility, including the following:

  1. Formal ADA Recreational Policy: The Parks and Recreation Department will develop a formal policy for accommodating disabled persons, where feasible. The City will look into adding a handicap accessible lift at the public pool, and has historically allowed disabled children to participate in City sponsored recreational programs on a case by case basis. However, a formal policy has not previously been established. It shall be the City's policy not to discriminate again disabled persons wishing to participate in a City-sponsored recreational activity, and as such, the City will do their best to accommodate all participants.
  2. Accessible Vehicle Transportation: Departments that operate transportation vehicles for the public include Parks and Recreation and Police. Neither department currently has a handicap accessible vehicle. At least one handicap accessible vehicle should be purchased by the City, or be made available to rent at short notice for use by these departments
  3. Backdoor Trash Pickup: The city provides backdoor trash pickup for elderly or disabled residents who are unable to bring their bin to the curb. This service is advertised publicly though alternate forms of communication to ensure that disabled residents are aware of the service.

Training for City Staff on ADA Compliance

In order to ensure effective implementation of this plan, and to afford staff with the tools necessary to provide better accessibility, the City will provide the following training on the following topics for staff:

  1. ADA Transition Plan training for all City staff
  2. Specialized training for field staff who may deal with the public as part of their job duties.
  3. ADA Coordinator training

CONCLUSION/ACTION LOG

The City is taking the actions referenced throughout this document and will continue to look for ways to remove barriers to access so that the disabled citizens of the City of Columbia are given access to the City's programs, services and activities.